diiq:

sonicthedestiel:

twinkletwinkleyoulittlefuck:

cell-mate:

crackerhell:

ethanwearsprada:

i think it’s a universal truth that everyone in our generation takes pluto’s losing its planetary status as a personal offense

yes

pluto is smaller than russia. why did we ever even consider it a planet?

BECAUSE IT’S A PART OF OUR SOLAR SYSTEM

OHANA MEANS FAMILY

FAMILY MEANS NO ONE IS LEFT BEHIND

OR FORGOTTEN

We didn’t banish Pluto from the solar system; we acknowledged that Pluto didn’t fit the identity we forced upon it. Now that we’re not insisting Pluto be a planet, we can see it for what it is - a small body, with a history more like the other small kuiper bodies. Instead of saying “oh its got such an unusual orbit for a planet, it’s so different and weird” we go “Hey it’s got a lot in common with Makemake and Haumea and Eris,” who are also totally part of the solar family! Look em up!

Just like people, labels and classifications say something about where we come from — not our worth.

here, have some quality “pluto isn’t a planet and that is good” stuff ^^^

My list of names is banal but astounding, and it’s barely a fraction, the ones that slip into view in the first minute or two. Anyone over sixty knows this; my list is only longer. I don’t go there often, but, once I start, the battalion of the dead is on duty, alertly waiting. Why do they sustain me so, cheer me up, remind me of life? I don’t understand this. Why am I not endlessly grieving?
I missed this Roger Angell piece on being 94 the first time it came around, if you did too it would be a good use of your time to read it.

Does it matter that we grow fond

of who we are though we are different
than before? We forfeit old diversions
and open different doors. So devoted
to moving on, we move on; except now
and then, oh the sighs in our hinges.

from "A Door in the Wind” by Maurya Simon, from the October 1985 issue of Poetry
shoutout to my main man st. thomas on easter, you slept late, missed jesus and were like “resurrected my aunt fanny, holes or it didn’t happen” and then jesus totally called you out

i hope you learned your lesson

shoutout to my main man st. thomas on easter, you slept late, missed jesus and were like “resurrected my aunt fanny, holes or it didn’t happen” and then jesus totally called you out

i hope you learned your lesson

slugzone:

theres a giant burning orb in the sky and it can burn your flesh, it can give you diseases, it can kill you, looking directly at it causes physical pain, and we all think this is okay. we like this orb.  we like to go outside and lie around on our backs when this orb is in the sky. children draw cute pictures of this levitating death orb with a smiley face on it. what is wrong with us

everything i have ever known and everything i have ever loved is only possible because 1,989,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 kg ball of hydrogen refuses to stop exploding, i think about this a lot and it never gets any less amazing

(via imathers)

INTERVIEWER

What would you consider the best intellectual training for the would-be writer?

HEMINGWAY

Let’s say that he should go out and hang himself because he finds that writing well is impossibly difficult. Then he should be cut down without mercy and forced by his own self to write as well as he can for the rest of his life. At least he will have the story of the hanging to commence with.

The Art of Fiction No. 21, Ernest Hemingway - The Paris Review (via sorryeveryone)

reblogging myself b/c i’ve been making some progress on this one poem lately and, not coincidentally, been p. mad at myself and how I feel writing

actuallygrimes:

i am obsessed with the production in this song and her voice is amazing

english needs a word for “the feeling you get when you find out grimes likes something you like

chelseahodson:

My essay, “Floor Plans,” is in Illuminati Girl Gang Vol. 4 now available for preorder.

I was going to pre-order this because it is named “Illuminati Girl Gang” & because I have been enjoying Inventory but it also includes work by Elizabeth Ellen, whose powers long time listeners will know has been discussed before, so I am excited to spend some time eyeing my mailbox with both anticipation and slight fear

chelseahodson:

My essay, “Floor Plans,” is in Illuminati Girl Gang Vol. 4 now available for preorder.

I was going to pre-order this because it is named “Illuminati Girl Gang” & because I have been enjoying Inventory but it also includes work by Elizabeth Ellen, whose powers long time listeners will know has been discussed before, so I am excited to spend some time eyeing my mailbox with both anticipation and slight fear

yourmandevine:

beatonna:

Here is a sketch comic I made called Ducks, in five parts.
Part One
Part Two
Part Three
Part Four
Part Five
Ducks is about part of my time working at a mining site in Fort McMurray, the events are from 2008.  It is a complicated place, it is not the same for all, and these are only my own experiences there.  It is a sketch because I want to test how I would tell these stories, and how I feel about sharing them.  A larger work gets talked about from time to time.  It is not a place I could describe in one or two stories.  Ducks is about a lot of things, and among these, it is about environmental destruction in an environment that includes humans.  Thank you for taking the time to read it.
-Kate

I love Kate Beaton’s work on "Hark! A Vagrant" because it’s hilarious. I love Kate Beaton’s work on this because it’s not, and I’m having a hard time shaking it.

I liked this quite a bit and it reminded me of Alice Munro’s story “The Turkey Season,” which is also about a young Canadian woman working a job with a bunch of men, and it as good a description of a hard to shake feeling as I have ever found:

"There was the Turkey Barn, on the edge of a white field, with a row of big pine trees behind it, and always, no matter how cold and still it was, these trees were lifting their branches and sighing and straining. It seems unlikely that on my way to the Turkey Barn, for an hour of gutting turkeys, I should have experienced such a sense of promise and at the same time of perfect, impenetrable mystery in the universe, but I did. Herb had something to do with that, and so did the cold snap – the series of hard, clear mornings. The truth is, such feelings weren’t hard to come by then. I would get them but not know how they were to be connected with anything in real life."

yourmandevine:

beatonna:

Here is a sketch comic I made called Ducks, in five parts.

Part One

Part Two

Part Three

Part Four

Part Five

Ducks is about part of my time working at a mining site in Fort McMurray, the events are from 2008.  It is a complicated place, it is not the same for all, and these are only my own experiences there.  It is a sketch because I want to test how I would tell these stories, and how I feel about sharing them.  A larger work gets talked about from time to time.  It is not a place I could describe in one or two stories.  Ducks is about a lot of things, and among these, it is about environmental destruction in an environment that includes humans.  Thank you for taking the time to read it.

-Kate

I love Kate Beaton’s work on "Hark! A Vagrant" because it’s hilarious. I love Kate Beaton’s work on this because it’s not, and I’m having a hard time shaking it.

I liked this quite a bit and it reminded me of Alice Munro’s story “The Turkey Season,” which is also about a young Canadian woman working a job with a bunch of men, and it as good a description of a hard to shake feeling as I have ever found:

"There was the Turkey Barn, on the edge of a white field, with a row of big pine trees behind it, and always, no matter how cold and still it was, these trees were lifting their branches and sighing and straining. It seems unlikely that on my way to the Turkey Barn, for an hour of gutting turkeys, I should have experienced such a sense of promise and at the same time of perfect, impenetrable mystery in the universe, but I did. Herb had something to do with that, and so did the cold snap – the series of hard, clear mornings. The truth is, such feelings weren’t hard to come by then. I would get them but not know how they were to be connected with anything in real life."

Some numbers on the audience for music

barthel:

The NCAA basketball finals, held last night, were watched by over 18 million people at their peak. That’s 6% of the U.S. population. In contrast, Pharrell’s “Happy,” currently the #1 single in the country, has sold about 3 million copies, or 1% of the U.S. population. (If single sales seem like a poor metric of listenership, the official video has 168 million views.) That’s months after its release, and a clear outlier. The #10 song on the chart this week, “Turn Down for What” by DJ Snake and Lil Jon (which has been on the chart longer than “Happy”) has sold a million copies (0.33% of the U.S. population), while the #10 movie at the box office, Liam Neeson’s “Non-Stop,” has been seen by 10 and a half million people, or 3.5% of the population[1].

More broadly, two-thirds of the adults in the U.S. and Canada go to the movies at least once per year. Only half buy music in any form. When people do buy music, one-half to two-thirds of their purchases are catalog (old) music.[2] Taken together, it seems fair to say that the audience for new music in America is somewhere between 16 and 25 percent of the population, versus 67% for new movies and around 95% for TV.

Read More

sometimes I think about how I & most of the people I know are outliers, if not in the technical sense than at least in the spiritual one, and how that can be as unsettling as it can be comforting, but some days it is neither, it just is.

The students left in Cycle 181 began to find that the center was full of affirmation. Everyone in the building would ask, “How are you?” and refuse to let you go until the answer was “Good!”

I am something like a positive person and the idea of being that positive with someone else, or having them be that positive to me, is genuinely frightening.

Is There Hope for the Survivors of the Drug Wars?

The notion that black America’s long bloody journey was accomplished through frequent alliance with the United States is an assailant’s-eye view of history. It takes no note of the fact that in 1860, most of this country’s exports were derived from the forced labor of the people it was “allied” with. It takes no note of this country electing senators who, on the Senate floor, openly advocated domestic terrorism. It takes no note of what it means for a country to tolerate the majority of the people living in a state like Mississippi being denied the right to vote. It takes no note of what it means to exclude black people from the housing programs, from the GI Bills, that built the American middle class. Effectively it takes no serious note of African-American history, and thus no serious note of American history.

Ta-Nehisi Coates, on why black culture and the culture of poverty are not same thing. (via theatlantic)

i would say this takes a while to get going but it’s moving pretty fast at the beginning and by the time it gets to the end it’s moving so fast you might have trouble seeing it but man alive, will you feel it

(via theatlantic)

The worst of all possible things that could happen would be to lose that language [that black people love so much]. There are certain things I cannot say without recourse to my language. It’s terrible to think that a child with five different present tenses comes to school to be faced with those books that are less than his own language. And then to be told things about his language, which is him, that are sometimes permanently damaging… This is a really cruel fallout of racism. I know the Standard English. I want to use it to help restore the other language, the lingua franca.

1. He ø runnin. Standard American English (SAE )= He is running.

2. He be runnin. SAE = He is usually running or He will/would be running.

3. He be steady runnin. SAE = He is usually running in an intensive, sustained manner, or He will/would be running in an intensive, sustained manner.

4. He(’s) been/bin runnin. SAE He has been running–at some earlier point, but probably not now.
Other examples: I been knowing her. SAE = I have known her.
About eleven o’clock he been eating. SAE = … he was eating.

5. He BEEN/BIN runnin’. SAE = He has been running for a long time, and still is.
-This is a use of the African American English (AAE) stressed been/remote BIN.

My mother Toni Morrison on AAVE (via howtobeterrell)

this is for whoever was telling me that AAVE isn’t a real thing… UGH

(via glassaquarium)

Note how precise each AAVE phrase is. 

(via thecrayonboxes)

Cries from perfection

(via youngbadmanbrown)

For anyone who thinks aave is just slang.
-Morgan

(via pocproblems)

I like this a lot but would like to note that while the paragraph is Morrison, the examples are not. The interview her piece is from can be seen in part here, if’n one is interested.

(via diiq)

putting this here so I can link to it from the podcast extended show notes, but this is an ethnic map of connecticut. the green dots represent white people, the blue ones black people and the yellow ones hispanic people. as you can see, connecitcut is hell of white. I grew up just where those blue dots in the center start to fan out, in one of the very few parts of connecticut that’s actually fairly diverse.

putting this here so I can link to it from the podcast extended show notes, but this is an ethnic map of connecticut. the green dots represent white people, the blue ones black people and the yellow ones hispanic people. as you can see, connecitcut is hell of white. I grew up just where those blue dots in the center start to fan out, in one of the very few parts of connecticut that’s actually fairly diverse.